writing links and excerpts :: creative, poetic, theory, collaborations.

Capture

Long thing, black snake light tipped goes up up into her nose. The insertion appears effortless. You see Eve’s throat waiting, moving like an animal, the stretchy mucus, the roof of her mouth, the muscular movements of the tongue. She uses a monitor on the floor in front of her to guide the scope down the back of her nose and into her throat. The music starts.

Is it going the wrong way? Is it going up up into the orbit of the eye rather than down towards the epiglottis, the laryngeal folds?

Barratt, Virginia and Eades, Q. “Vocal Womb and the ekphrasis machine (we die),” Axon: Creative Explorations, 8, no. 1 (2018) http://www.axonjournal.com.au/issue-14/vocal-womb-and-ekphrasis-machine-we-die

 

There were four. Of this I am fairly certain. C(o)unt them.
I remember this:
on the bus, they leaned in and whispered:
                                                                     does the gen stand for
                                                                     gender or generation?
Nothing is decided.
(for in the zero of the undecided is the roiling energy of becoming)
Instead the four simply fashion a vapor into the shape of an X

and set it free

(Forthcoming) Barratt, Virginia. “Cyberfeminist Timelords”. Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics, Special Issue, Electronic Literature.

i mean we’re all damaged goods, right, and if we look with the naked eye (scales fallen) we get to see each other’s ragged parts, where selves become unseamly, and the fraying fabric is endearing and sobering, because yes, we see frailty and broken bits and tremulous insecurities.  this mutual seeing—it’s like two wounds are kissing, and pathogens mingle and then there is an infection.

we are all we are all we are all so shattered and undeserving. and yet, pure. you know.

Barratt, Virginia. “Monstering the Logos Eros,” in Writing From Below. Melboure: Contamination From Above. 2, no. 2 (2016)

              searching for a memento. what to do with a life-to-date and its accretions? you put it all neatly to bed in a skip, covered by a favorite rug, the crocheted op-shop rug, the comforter. you leave one woolen corner draped over the metal edging. a friend recovers the coveted comforter. it becomes part of the archives. the mongrel archives. the shapeless and fluxing interpretive archives, boxes growing soft with time and slumping under the weight of stories.

Barratt, Virginia. “SkipToEnd,” in Writing From Below. Melboure: Contamination From Above. 2, no. 2 (2016)

On the first morning of the first day I met her, legs slung over the back of a bench seat on the railway station concourse, wearing a smile so wide you could walk right on in, she gallantly carried my bags back from the train station to her home. On the first morning of the first day in the dappled light of her red room among the detritus of her fractured junkie life I lay on top of her, both of us fully clothed, her long stalks of legs encased in skinny grey cord. I wriggled my hand in, a tight fit, and felt with tingling delight a stomach all downy. Under her shirt I fingered the redgold hairs decorating her chest. I liked this uncommon furriness. It signaled a point of difference between us.

Barratt, Virginia. “She is a Boy,” in Mud map: Australian women’s experimental writing, Special Issue, Text Journal Website series no. 1 (2013) edited by Moya Costello, Barbara Brooks, Anna Gibbs and Rosslyn Prosser. ISSN: 1327-9556

Donna Haraway was our guide and we took her at her word.
We’d rather be cyborgs than goddesses, and so we shopped ourselves a borg or two.

VNS mobilised Haraway’s cyborg subject of political reflection and agency through a mutant family, complete with contradictions, parodic characterisations, navigating the contested zones by rational and irrational compasses, fuelled by g-slime.

G-slime never forgot the flesh.

Barratt, Virginia and Francesca da Rimini. “Hexing the Alien,” Spheres Journal for Digital Cultures, Ecologies of Change. No. 2, December (2015)

i stop in the middle of a blizzard of leaves,
dancing in the sudden hot wind. close my eyes.
(this isn’t happening)
nature’s abstraction performs distance,
wilderness, estrangement. in the smoke haze, in
the finch frenzy, in the snapping whipbird call,
in the hot (still) breeze, in the glittering glittering
green-there i fall together in grace.
(this isn’t happening)
in this moment of bursting free of the infinity of
suffocating folds i am beautiful

Excerpt from SLICE, a long form poetic performative text. Plinth Journal 2016

These images, in their erasure of any hint of messy, ugly, living and dying women, allow a kind of not-talking about suicide. They allow us to not-see Sylvia’s cherry-red face, or the cyanotic blue hue of a strangulation, or the broken body and caved-in skull of a self-defenestration. The problem with these images is that they also allow us to not-see a meaningful representation of the moments before the act, which for these women were probably not ‘quiet’ or ‘eerily beautiful’ but filled with terror and desperation at the dissolution of identity. The problem with these images is their use of the suicide act – which, if nothing else, is a sincere one – to sell the insincere transience of coolness, a consensual hallucination of infallible, almost Stepford-like autonomy.

Selected Publications:
Blind refereed:

(Forthcoming) Barratt, Virginia. “Cyberfeminist Timelords”. Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics, Special Issue, Electronic Literature.
Barratt, Virginia, da Rimini, F and Nillson, A. “Xenokin and Queer Morphologies,” Writing from Below, Special Issue, Space and Place, 4, no. 3 (2019) https://writingfrombelow.org/space-and-place/xenokin-and-queer-morphologies/
Barratt, Virginia and Eades, Q. “Vocal Womb and the ekphrasis machine (we die),” Axon: Creative Explorations, 8, no. 1 (2018) http://www.axonjournal.com.au/issue-14/vocal-womb-and-ekphrasis-machine-we-die
Barratt, Virginia, “say a body,” Transqueer, Cordite Poetry Review, 88 (2018) http://cordite.org.au/poetry/transqueer/say-a-body/
Barratt, Virginia and da Rimini, F. “Mmyth is is,” Writing from Below, 3, no. 2 (2017)
Barratt, Virginia. 2017 “mMouth hHouse pPanic cCathedral,” Queer Modes: New Australian
Poetry, Cordite Poetry Review. http://cordite.org.au/chapbooks-features/queering/mmouth-hhouse-ppanic-ccathedral/
Barratt, Virginia. 2017. “This Poem is not a Panic,” Brien, D.L. and Eades, Q. (ed), Offshoot: contemporary life writing methodologies and practice, UWA Publishing, Crawley, W.A.